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Author Topic: Bing from Europe - Does the trademark date it?  (Read 1157 times)

Earlytimes

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  • Bob
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  Very nice engine and like was mentioned the smokey base was a good looking finish. I have a little overtype ( someplace ? ) that has the same logo on it. The partnership lets you date them pretty close. Enjoy.
Collect antique engines mostly with a focus on condition and completeness over make.

komet163b

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  I understand the partnership scenarios, but I'm still flummoxed by
plastic handles on the throttle and whistle.  The base, engine, and
firebox are all very nice looking.  Very different look from my
Bing-Wolf twin though apparently they were both made pre-WWII.

  Gotta love those German industrialists, they leave nothing to waste.
During WWII they produced unauthorized airplanes out of spare parts.
The plane was just that good but out-of-favor. 

  One other thing.  There was mention of a 'VEDES' badge on the base.
I see none but there appears to be a area where there was a circular
sticker.  Could the badge have been a stick-on?

Thanks,
Wayne
 

Dr.Rev.DelmarMacReady

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What's the diameter of your bung hole?

On the engine, you bunch of miscreants. Gonna nip that in the bud right now.

With a diameter it might be easier to determine thread pitch. That said, a few sellers offer parted-out engine bits on the Bay. Not to mention the treasure trove lurking in Charlie's cupboards.
Bennydaheeb

Earlytimes

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  • Bob
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  I understand the partnership scenarios, but I'm still flummoxed by
plastic handles on the throttle and whistle.  The base, engine, and
firebox are all very nice looking.  Very different look from my
Bing-Wolf twin though apparently they were both made pre-WWII.

  Gotta love those German industrialists, they leave nothing to waste.
During WWII they produced unauthorized airplanes out of spare parts.
The plane was just that good but out-of-favor. 

  One other thing.  There was mention of a 'VEDES' badge on the base.
I see none but there appears to be a area where there was a circular
sticker.  Could the badge have been a stick-on?

Thanks,
Wayne
 

 
 Verdes sound familiar.....   and they did start using stickers on some engines in this time period. Doll engines for instance used stickers, not sure when they started but I do have a large Bing that has a cast fire box door with their early logo cast into it GBN = Brother Bing Nuremberg is what I believe it stands for, and it also has a small sticker on it's cast base similar to the logo on yours - BW= Bing Works. My theory is it was made before WW1 and stored during the war as they retooled for the war effort. Then it came out after the war and they put their new logo sticker on it. Just my thoughts on what might have happened. 
Collect antique engines mostly with a focus on condition and completeness over make.

komet163b

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  The boiler's bung-hole is the same as the filler
hole in the top f the boiler.  That screw-plug is
6mm, or just less that 1/4".  Since this is German,
and the marks lie up to 6mm perfectly, I'd say
it is 6mm.  The threaded portion of the top plug
is about 4mm and I count 7 or 8 threads.  I'm
off to a hardware store today to see whats up and
check it on their thread-checking display board.

  But, to bring up an old question, 'plastic knobs'
on the throttle and whistle?  Can they be original
and from the 30's?  Just seems a bit incongruous.

Thanks,
Wayne

Earlytimes

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  • Bob
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  They might be bakelite ?   
Collect antique engines mostly with a focus on condition and completeness over make.

yussufhippo

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RE: VEDES - just read my previous post in this thread!

komet163b

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  So, the German toy manufacturers made engines/items for the VEDES toy retailers organization.
In the case of engines, were they made to VEDES specific orders/requests from the manufacturers?
German finances were very complicated in the Third Reich.  There was more than one kind of money
and how each kind could be used was determoned by the bad guys.  If the bad guys hadn't gone
to war and stolen other countries wealth and resources, killed millions, then deservedly lost it all, they
would have  gone bankrupt.  By the late '30's many worldwide companyies would no longer accept
German currency for payment.  At least that is the way the history book presented it.

  Takeaways. It is old.  The handles are probably bakelite.  I beleive the ghost remains of a sticker on
the base was probably the VEDES sticker.  I still need a blowdown tap and an original burner but can
move on without them.   It is very clean for its age, runs well on air,  and I hope to steam it up soon.

Wayne   

Earlytimes

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  • Bob
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 This seller on German eBay has lots of parts .... glueckskind101   
Collect antique engines mostly with a focus on condition and completeness over make.

komet163b

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Thanks.  I'll investigate the German seller in a bit.  Sounds
like a good lead.

  First the good news.  It steamed up perfectly on an SEL
two-wick burner and the engine took off after a good nudge.
Really good to see.  There was some hissing and water leakage
around the sight-glass, however, and the metal retainer had some
give in it so I cleaned the slot in the screw, matched up the screwdriver
for it, and turned it just a bit.  Turned easy about 20 degrees so I
stopped and felt lucky it didn't strip.  The retainer wasn't any tighter
but...whatever condition the original packing was in after 90 or so years
it did not appreciate my effort and leaked more than ever.  Still runs
steadily but not speedy like before with more hissing at the sight-glass.

  So, I want to fix this for good.  Before I take it apart I'd like to take
this opportunity to ask for advice from anyone who has replaced this
type of sight-glass.  Better to know beforehand of any booby-traps
or 'usual' mistakes and what materials I may need.

Thanks,
Wayne


Earlytimes

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  • Bob
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  Remove the screws and try and save the glass. I think it's U shaped or straight with two right angle bends that go into the boiler. Hopefully the treads are good. Then you just need to clean everything up and reseal the glass to the boiler. If you can post pic's of how it looks coming apart. I forget what was used to seal these ? I think they had a rubber gasket that pushed into the boiler and the glass slipped into it.
  Someone here I'm sure knows. 
Collect antique engines mostly with a focus on condition and completeness over make.

komet163b

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  Thanks.  The clue about pushing the gasket into the endcap hole
a bit and then inserting the tube into the gasket causing it to seal
is mint.  The brass retainer then keeps everything in place.  I like it. 
Makes sense.

  Anyone else with two cents to add.  Apropos gasket materials, vintage
or modern?  Any photos of it being done would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Wayne
 

Earlytimes

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  • Bob
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   I've had success making gaskets out of silicon tubing. I have a few different sizes I bought a few years ago at a hobby shop. The stuff lasts a long time and is soft and playable. The screws will need to be sealed too. A tube of silicon sealer could be used on the screws. They make a high temp silicon for gaskets in automotive. Just try and keep it neat looking so it looks factory..... at least I do.  The drain fitting that's missing might be more difficult if the threads are bad. I think they would solder a nut to the inside of the boiler for more threads and these can come loose. As they leak people keep tightening them and then they strip. You have to get creative sometimes with fixes. All this has been done before so if you run into a jam start a thread on the repair. 
Collect antique engines mostly with a focus on condition and completeness over make.

komet163b

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Thanks for your advice on refitting the sightglass tubes.  I take
every suggestion and add it to the total.  I'll wait to see if there
are any others, stir them all in a pot, and hopefully come up
with a goo strategy.

As to the drain/blow-down hole in the end cap - it has perfect
threads and I'm working on contacting an EBAY seller in Germany
who might have what I need.

Still locked down - on and off pouring here in Brooklyn.  What do you
do if you've already steamed everything up?

Wayne

 

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